‘It’s an opportunity for diggers to catch up’

‘It’s an opportunity for diggers to catch up’

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Gosnells resident Judy Leat lit a candle during this year’s driveway dawn service. Photograph — Aaron Van Rongen.

Although traditional commemorative ceremonies couldn’t go ahead, locals found various ways to remember those who served and died in wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations on ANZAC Day.

The City of Gosnells encouraged the community to stand in front of their driveways and tune into one of the dawn services transmitted through social media or radio stations across the nation.

Although the driveway dawn service was a noble idea, Gosnells’ RSL president Stuart Holmes said it couldn’t replace traditional dawn services.

“I stood up in front of my driveway with my niece, lit a candle and did the minute of silence,” he said.

“My neighbours also participated in front of their driveways and our RSL members
did too.

Although the driveway dawn service gave an opportunity for people to still pay their respects, as a veteran I still prefer the traditional way of doing it.

“In this way children can still learn about the importance of this day and see for themselves what ANZAC Day ceremonies truly mean.

“It is also an opportunity for diggers to catch up with new diggers and remember those who were lost.”