Sherree’s road to recovery

Sherree’s road to recovery

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Sherree Morgan is working hard on her recovery whilst maintaining her passion.

Stroke survivor Sherree Morgan smashed her fundraising target for the Stroke Foundation when she took part in the foundation’s Stride4Stroke in November, but she still has a long way to go on her road to recovery.
The Examiner wrote about Sherree’s efforts in the lead up to her fundraising drive, and since then the Mt Richon mum has raised $2750 through her efforts.
Sherree set herself the goal of running 100km in November, but converted to cycling after the physical toll of running was too much to endure.
“My initial goal was to run 100km in the month of November, but I ended up not running because I still have a dissected artery in my neck and the impact was too much, so I converted to cycling, I was doing 12km a day,” said Sherree.
“It was pretty difficult towards the end. I’m still in outpatient rehab, so I complete physiotherapy and occupational therapy weekly, and I still take myself to the gym three or four times a week. I’m working hard for recovery.”
“Stride4Stroke was a challenge, but it was a very welcome challenge and definitely for a worthy cause.”
Sheree’s efforts did not go unnoticed.
WA State Manager for the Stroke Foundation, Luke Hays, was grateful for Sherree’s fundraising contribution.
“Stroke Foundation would simply not be able to carry out its work without the support of people like Sherree,” said Mr Hays.
“Every year we are amazed and inspired by the people who dedicate their time and efforts by supporting us during Stride4Stroke, and every single dollar genuinely makes a difference.”
“Sherree raised $2750, which smashed her personal target – that’s a fantastic effort. A huge thank you to everyone involved.”
Sheree, who is working hard to return to her career as a fitness instructor, does not fit the mould of a stroke victim, which usually affects those over 65-years-old.
“I’m young, I’m fit, I’m not overweight, I’m a group fitness instructor, I don’t smoke, I only drank socially,” she said.
“I was misdiagnosed in the initial instance. I knew there was something wrong the night I went to hospital, I told my husband, ‘You need to ring me an ambulance, I’m having a stroke.’”
“I knew there was something definitely not right with me. I went to hospital, but I was discharged with a migraine and 72 hours later I was finally diagnosed and looked after.”
And Sherree’s path to recovery will continue for another year at least.
“I will never get back to teaching group fitness, I’ve been strongly advised by the neurological team not to return. But a slow return to fitness with the physio team will hopefully mean I can make a gradual return to work,” said Sheree, who was diagnosed in January 2021.
“There’s no direct answer, you’ve just got to keep pushing and working and take setbacks as they come.”
“To have a goal and something to work towards is always important. Just becoming a part of a community with a sense of being again is so important.”
Nearly 1400 fundraisers volunteered in last year’s Stride4Stroke, raising $459,637.
For more information visit stride4stroke.org.au