Great new space to clear your head

Great new space to clear your head

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Headspace Armadale centre manager Annette Chivers and clinical lead Pearl Proud urged young people to seek help early if they thought they had a mental health issue. Photograph — Matt Devlin.
Headspace Armadale centre manager Annette Chivers and clinical lead Pearl Proud urged young people to seek help early if they thought they had a mental health issue. Photograph — Matt Devlin.
Headspace Armadale centre manager Annette Chivers and clinical lead Pearl Proud. Photograph - Matt Devlin.
Headspace Armadale centre manager Annette Chivers and clinical lead Pearl Proud. Photograph – Matt Devlin.

With higher rates of mental health issues young people in Armadale were being urged to not ignore symptoms and seek help early during mental health week this week.

Headpsace Armadale centre manager Annette Chivers said since the centre opened in June they had received more than 3000 enquiries, 200 referrals from young people and provided more than 1100 sessions.

She said there had been a pattern of mental health issues in Armadale young people relating to trauma, which presented as anxiety, depression, self-harm, stress and sometimes suicidal thoughts.

“A lot of young people are seeking help for these issues as well as substance use, bullying, family conflict and school,” she said.

Ms Chivers said adolescence and early adulthood were a critical time in a person’s life when it came to preventing or identifying mental health issues and illnesses.

“Research shows that 75 per cent of mental health disorders emerge before the age of 25,” she said.

“By ensuring help is accessed in those early stages, young people can get things back on track.”

She said Armadale had a higher rate of young people aged between 15 and 24 years with mental health issues as well as higher anxiety and alcohol related hospitalisations than the state average.

She said this was all the more reason for young people to seek help as early as possible.

“The message that headspace has for young people is that there is no issue too small to see us about,” she said.

“The sooner you get help the sooner things can begin to improve.

“Headspace aims to intervene early to assist young people with their mental health and wellbeing and assist them to link in with services and supports, all on the one site. Mental health wellbeing is nothing to feel ashamed about and everyone feels vulnerable and low at some point in their lives.

“Understanding what you are going through helps in the healing process and gives the opportunity to develop strategies to cope with stressful and anxious situations when they come up.”

Recent research commissioned by mental health Australia in time for mental health week found young adults between 18 and 29 were the least likely to socialise with friends and family.

The research also found of all people only 18 per cent regularly sought help if they were stressed or down.

Mental health Australia chief executive Frank Quinlan said the result was concerning.
“With only 18 per cent regularly seeking help, we have a long way to go to make it okay to do something about our mental health and wellbeing,” he said.

Mental health week was aimed at improving knowledge of mental health and reduce the stigma around mental illnesses.

It coincided with world mental health day on October 10. Visit mhw.waamh.org.au.

If you or someone you know is suffering from mental health issues or illnesses call headspace Armadale on 9393 0300 or visit the centre at 40 Fourth Road, Armadale.