Students take a stand

Students take a stand

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Kelmscott Senior High School staff and students with Armadale Gosnells Landcare Group officer Ross Wylie. Photograph - Chloe Vellinga.

Everything from insects to small mammals has a new haven of food and shelter thanks to the efforts of a Landcare volunteer and students from a local school.

Students from Kelmscott Senior High’s specialist agriculture program rolled up their sleeves this week to join Armadale Gosnells Landcare Group officer Ross Wylie to plant a mix of native plants along the Canning River in Kelmscott.

Mr Wylie said the area along the river near the Gilwell Street bridge was prone to erosion, therefore revegetation was necessary to stabilise the waterway.

“Wetland plant species help strip nutrients and pollution from the water that come from farmland upstream and would otherwise contribute to algae blooms further downstream in the Swan,” he said.

“They also form habitat corridors for animals to move along the river contributing to an enriched ecosystem.”

Head of agriculture Derek Edmondson said the planting sessions with Armadale Gosnells Landcare Group fit in with the concepts of sustainability and resource protection, which were fundamental to the agriculture industry.

“Students are quite aware of the scale of global environmental problems and can be overwhelmed by them,” he said.

“By acting within their local environment it can provide a sense of satisfaction and also help them to feel that something can be done.”

Everything from insects to small mammals has a new haven of food and shelter thanks to the efforts of a Landcare volunteer and students from a local school.

Students from Kelmscott Senior High’s specialist agriculture program rolled up their sleeves this week to join Armadale Gosnells Landcare Group officer Ross Wylie to plant a mix of native plants along the Canning River in Kelmscott.

Mr Wylie said the area along the river near the Gilwell Street bridge was prone to erosion, therefore revegetation was necessary to stabilise the waterway.

“Wetland plant species help strip nutrients and pollution from the water that come from farmland upstream and would otherwise contribute to algae blooms further downstream in the Swan,” he said.

“They also form habitat corridors for animals to move along the river contributing to an enriched ecosystem.”

Head of agriculture Derek Edmondson said the planting sessions with Armadale Gosnells Landcare Group fit in with the concepts of sustainability and resource protection, which were fundamental to the agriculture industry.

“Students are quite aware of the scale of global environmental problems and can be overwhelmed by them,” he said.

“By acting within their local environment it can provide a sense of satisfaction and also help them to feel that something can be done.”

Photographs – Chloe Vellinga.